Informa

04-07/11/2020

S.E.C.C

District 7, HCMC, Vietnam

 

 

Article 23

Here's How Process Industries Battle Metallic Corrosion

Looking at the potential, there can be more burdens placed on asset infrastructure owners and product manufacturers toward end-of-life management, so making early considerations in the design and planning phase will become a more critical aspect of engineering.

FREMONT, CA: Metallic corrosion is the consequence of electrochemical interaction connecting substances and metal present inside the operating surroundings, such as water. Corrosion results in degradation of material to the point where it is no longer structurally or mechanically fitting its purpose.

Corrosion offers a formidable global challenge. It influences many products and roughly all infrastructures through increased maintenance, shorter product lifecycles, end-of-life management, and overall use of more resources over a product’s life. The financial and environmental impact is noteworthy, and it is time that firms place the fight against corrosion in an appropriate sustainability context.

Corrosion Impacts Profoundly On the Environment

In reply to more considerable attention in issues concerning sustainability and environmental impact, engineers are encouraged to design infrastructure and products that can minimize negative societal and environmental impact. Sustainability in design, enhancing a product’s lifecycle, reducing maintenance needs and end-of-life upcycling/ recycling are all becoming a significant part of product quality, performance, and overall cost.

Looking at the potential, there can be more burdens placed on asset infrastructure owners and product manufacturers toward end-of-life management, so making early considerations in the design and planning phase will become a more critical aspect of engineering. Life Cycle Assessments (LCAs) are becoming more significant products from both a consumer and a regulator viewpoint.

More Rigid and Cost-Effective Fastener Solutions

Stainless steel fasteners have long been employed in corrosive settings like within the oil and gas industry, chemical processing, water treatment industry, marine, and coastal applications. Lately, stainless steel materials, primarily austenitic grades A2 (304) and A4 (316), have grown to be more readily available, chiefly due to low-price, high-volume Asian manufacturers.

Nonetheless, interest in high-grade alloy fasteners and premium stainless has increased. Within the suitable application, they proffer enhanced product performance, concentrated maintenance, and can help maximize the product lifecycle.

Predominantly in more technical industries safety, performance, and reliability are all decisive factors. So, engineers are now starting to give more thought to an ever-increasing choice of fastener material and product options available to them to design tougher and long-term, cost-effective infrastructure and products.

Source: Manufacturing Technology Insights, 27/02/2020 

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